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Sunday, June 25, 2017
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Foster Care

Wednesday's Child, sponsored by the Freddie Mac Foundation, is a weekly television feature about adoption that helps find permanent, loving, adoptive families for children in foster care. Wednesday's Child Georgia is a partnership of the Georgia Department of Human Services, the Freddie Mac Foundation and Fox 5 in Atlanta.


 
OTHER FOSTER CARE SERVICES
 
CREATIVE COMMUNITY SERVICES
Main Office
4487 Park Drive, Suite A
Norcross, GA 30093
Phone: 770.469.6226
Toll-free: 1-866-618-2823
Fax: 770.469.6210
Email:
info@ccsgeorgia.org
http://ccsgeorgia.org/
Hours of Operation: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. (Eastern)
 
 
EMBRACE
David Meyers, EMBRACE Director
UGA Fanning Institute
1240 S. Lumpkin Street
Athens, GA 30602-3552
www.fanning.uga.edu
P:  706 542-5062
dmeyers@fanning.uga.edu
 
Go-Betweener™ Mentoring Program
Nick Cheadle, Program Manager
P: 404-825-8145
F: 404-292-8458 Culture Connect; 678-594-7586 Success for All Students
Culture Connect, Inc.
 
 
youthSpark!
 
Family Visitation Program
395 Pryor Street, SW
 
Atlanta, GA 30312
P: 404-224-4633
 
 
MAAC - Multi-Agency Alliance for Children
Eight non-profit behavioral health care providers united to serve children and families through MAAC, with services ranging from assessments to intensive psychiatric care, adoptions to residential group homes, therapeutic foster care to maternity care.
 
 
United Methodist Children's Home
Denise Peacock, Foster Care Recruiter
500 S. Columbia Drive, Decatur, GA 30030
P:  404-327-5864
dpeacock@umchildrenshome.org
 
 

 
HB 1085 (FOSTERING CONNECTIONS) 
This legislation is in alignment with SB 292 (Juvenile Code Reform). 
 
HB 1085:  Fostering Connections
 
The federal Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (H.R. 6893/P.L. 110-351) was designed to help hundreds of thousands of vulnerable children find a safe, loving and permanent home by increasing opportunities for adoption and relative guardianship. It also focuses on improving critical education and health care services for children in foster care and better preparing older youth for adulthood.
 
Background
 
Mandatory Provisions of Federal Law
·         Enhancing Support of Relative Caregivers
·         Promoting Sibling Co-Placement and Visitation
·         Improving Education and Health Care Access
·         Improves Planning for Youth Transition to Adulthood
·         Strengthening Adoption
 
Reasons for Pursuing HB 1085 in the Georgia General Assembly
·         This legislation would assure Division of Family and Children Services (DFCS) compliance with the federal Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (outlined above).
·         This proposal would include:
o    addition of an element to the case planning process to ensure that reasonable efforts are made to assure placement of siblings together or to allow them ample visitation if they cannot be placed together;
o    addition of case planning requirement regarding attention to the health and educational needs of foster children; and
o    add a requirement that a written transitional living plan for every child be completed no later than 90 days prior to their 18th birthday or their eventual exit from care.
 
Consequences for Failure to Comply
US Department of Health and Human Services could withhold funding in excess of $80 million of Title IV-E funding annually.
 
To find your local representative go to:  http://www.legis.state.ga.us/legis/FindLegislator.htm

 Digital Stories from the Field  http://www.nrcpfc.org/digital_stories/
The National Resource Center for Permanency and Family Connections (NRCPFC) at the Hunter College School of Social Work, A Service of the Children's Bureau, has developed this new web site. This site represents NRCPFC’s on-going work to create digital stories with key stakeholders in the child welfare field. Digital Storytelling takes full advantage of the advent/diffusion of increasingly more accessible technology tools like audio, photo, and video equipment. In their own voices, storytellers present their narratives, combining their voices with images, sounds, and video, to create short, powerful digital movies that can be easily shared with a designated audience. The movies have particular utility for individuals and organizations providing TA to States, Localities, and Tribes, or those in Social Work educational settings, as these stories literally bring the voices and experiences of those most affected by the child welfare system into the room.
This new web site currently has over forty stories representing the perspectives of former foster youth, social workers, supervisors, parents, family partners, advocates, judges and CASA workers. As new stories are added, the NRCPFC Weekly Update will notify subscribers of their availability. Current stories cover a wide range of topics including permanency, adoption, reunification, youth development, the importance of parent and youth voice in case planning, and the role of courts and the judicial system in planning for and with families.
Each story is accompanied by additional web-based resources on the story topic. We know that you will enjoy watching these and will find that they are powerful examples of what happens when we encourage the voices of those most affected by our systems to emerge and tell their stories.

 
                                                                                                                                                                   

 

   

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